Black Currant Lovers

Black Currants
Black Currants

 The highly coveted pure black currant jam is almost ready…

Black and Red Currants
Black and Red Currants

I also have a red and black currant jam…

For the black currant lovers I promised this jam…come and get a jar this Saturday ~October 26th~ at Lonsdale Quay Farmer’s Market…

Bits of Summer

Sour Cherry on a Platter
Sour Cherry on a Platter

I hope your summer has been sumptuous.

Labour of Love
Labor of Love

My summer was filled with joy, hard work, dreams and inspiration.

Cherished Strawberries
Cherished Strawberries

I spent a lot of time with strawberries. Always a favourite…Have you tried my Strawberry Balsamic jam?

Charming Daisy
Charming Daisy

Daisies have been adorning our table at the market all summer.

Dreaming of Summer
Dreaming of Summer

There was a lot of tree climbing too…

Lazy Afternoons
Lazy Afternoons

There was a few lazy afternoon..

Always Ready for Work
Always Ready for Work

But most of the time we worked really hard.

Grand-Maman Loulou, a True Supporter
Grand-Maman Loulou, a True Supporter

A visitor from the East was very helpful…

Have You Met Che?
Have You Met Che?

Che is the most social and adorable living thing you will meet at the market.

Celebrating Summer
Celebrating Summer

Escapade to the sea..

Black Plum, Fresh Bay Leaves, Vanilla and Brandy Jam....
Black Plum, Fresh Bay Leaves, Vanilla and Brandy Jam….

And then autumn arrived with new flavours in Le Meadow’s kitchen. Black plum cooked with fresh bay leaves, vanilla and brandy. Pear, sage and maple syrup. Aprium, orange and vanilla bean.

Aprium
Aprium

Aprium : a plum-apricot hybrid. Aprium are 75% apricot and 25% plum. They have a richer flavour than apricots and are firmer and larger. When cooked, they acquire a gorgeous bright orange colour.

Oh So Good...Aprium and Orange

We made a luscious jam with orange, aprium and vanilla bean.

Our New Star at the Market!
Our New Star at the Market!

It’s available at the market, and very popular!

Sharing the Bounty
Sharing the Bounty

Everyone loves this new jam.

More Flavours
So many flavours

We have over 17 flavours to choose from. Come to the market to try them ! We are in Whistler every Sunday until October 13th. We are at Lonsdale Quay on Saturdays for the entire month of October and on Granville Island, Thursdays until October 17th. Soon I will announce the fall and winter schedule with new markets and new flavours!

A New Market and some Buckwheat Crȇpes!

Croissant de Lune
Croissant de Lune

Last Friday night market was a success with our new Banana gone Gourmet jam.. Have you tried it yet with a fresh croissant?

Cooking Banana Jam
Cooking Banana Jam

It is also delicious on crêpes made with buckwheat flour…scroll down for the recipe…

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This Sunday is our first market in Whistler… It is also Father’s Day!

From the Mountain I wish Happy Father's Day to my Papa
From the Mountain I Wish Happy Father’s Day to my Papa
Gooseberry Ripening
Gooseberry Ripening

 Only few hours of sunshine away before we start making gooseberry jelly and strawberry jam.

Chamomile
Chamomile

We are waiting patiently, drinking chamomile and lemon balm iced tea..

Picking Wild Flowers
Picking Wild Flowers

And making wild flowers bouquet for our table at the market.

Waiting for Strawberries
Waiting for Strawberries

We hope to see you this Sunday at the Whistler’s Farmer’s Market! We will have more of the Banana gone Gourmet , Blue Velvet , Fiery Rhubarb, Sunshine in a Jar and Bitter Sweet Morning!

Buckwheat Crêpe

Buckwheat Crȇpe
Buckwheat Crȇpe

Ingredients

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

1 cup buckwheat flour

1/3 cup unbleached all- purpose flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 1/2 cup whole milk

3 large eggs

1.Cook the butter in a small pan, cast iron works best, until golden brown. Remove the pan from heat and let cool.

2.Sift together dry ingredients in a large bowl.

3.Whisk together milk, eggs, and brown butter in a bowl.

4.Add the egg mixture to the flour mixture and whisk until smooth.

5.Refrigerate batter, covered, for 30 minutes or overnight.

To cook the crêpes:

1.Brush a 12-inch cast iron skillet with butter and heat over med high heat. Remove the skillet from the heat.

2.Stir batter and pour about 1/4 cup into skillet, tilting and rotating pan to cover the bottom.

3.Return skillet to the heat and cook until a light golden and top appears almost dry.

4.Loosen up crêpe with a spatula and flip over. Cook until bottom is golden, about 30 seconds.

5.Slide crêpe onto a large plate and keep warm in oven while you make more crêpes in the same manner.

6.Serve with Banana gone Gourmet,Blue Velvet or Rhubarb in Bloom Jam, and crème fraîche.

Recipe adapted from The Gourmet Cookbook.

Banana gone Gourmet

Banana Chocolate Jam
Banana Chocolate Jam

We have a new jam! Banana, dark chocolate ~70% cocoa~ and vanilla~!

Rhubarb and Ginger Jam
Rhubarb and Ginger Jam

And we added some ginger to rhubarb to make a Fiery Rhubarb Jam!

First Strawberry
First Strawberry

Yesterday we harvested the very first strawberry in our garden.

Strawberries Ripening to Perfection
Strawberries Ripening to Perfection

Dreaming of Strawberry Jam..

Baby Peach
Baby Peach

And peach jam..

Gooseberry
Gooseberry

These gooseberry will make the perfect jelly with strawberry, blackberry or maybe raspberry?

Apple Tree
Apple Tree

Our apple tree is abounding.

Wild Roses
Wild Roses

Wild roses petals will be harvested and dried this week end. When the apples are ready, we will make a stellar Apple Jelly with Wild Roses and Calvados!

Vanilla Ice Cream with Banana Dark Chocolate Jam
Vanilla Ice Cream with Banana Dark Chocolate Jam

Ice cream + banana chocolate jam, almond butter + banana chocolate jam sandwich, fresh butter croissant +banana chocolate jam, vanilla cake + banana chocolate jam, strawberries dipped in banana chocolate jam, cheesecake +banana chocolate jam….

Banana chocolate Jam, Rhubarb Ginger Jam
Banana chocolate Jam, Rhubarb Ginger Jam

Come on down to the Shipyard tonight, Banana gone Gourmet and Fiery Rhubarb are making their farmer’s market debut!

Ready For the Market!

Ready for the Market

With over twelve different flavours..and more to come, we are ready for the market!

Getting Ready for the Night Market at the Shipyard

Tomorrow we will be at the Shipyard again, last week was cold and rainy~ Vancouver~ but we still had a good time and want to thank all of you who brave the rain and cold night to try our preserves!

Saturday you will find us at the Squamish Farmer’s Market.

Dandelion
Dandelion

Our Dandelion Nectar was a success!

Rhubarb in Bloom
Rhubarb in Bloom

And the Rhubarb in Bloom !

Sowing Oats
Sowing Oats

Meanwhile at Le Meadow’s, everything is looking beautiful and we are working very hard to have the sweetest fruits for our preserves!

So Many Cherries!
So Many Cherries!

Soon we will have so many cherries to turn into luscious preserves! Keep an eye for our Rhubarb and Cherry Jam!

Iris against the Barn
Iris against the Barn

We hope to see you this week end! Friday night at the Shipyard in North Vancouver and Saturday all day in Squamish!

Grand-Maman Irène’s Rhubarb Cake

Apple Blossom
Apple Blossom

The sun is visiting Le Meadow’s Pantry this week, revealing the blossoms in the apple tree, drying the last blossoms in the cherry tree and, making the rhubarb blush.

Dandelion Field
Dandelion Field

There are still a lot of dandelions and bees in the field. Enough to make more dandelion nectar.

Dandelion Petals
Dandelion Petals

We use 365 flowers to make 5 jars. Why 365? To celebrate the 365 suns that have risen and set since last year’s spring.

Dandelion Nectar
Dandelion Nectar

Dandelion Nectar is as bright as the sun and taste as sweet as honey. It is simply spring in a jar.

Grand-Maman Irène upside down rhubarb cake
Grand-Maman Irène’s upside down rhubarb cake

We harvested the first rhubarb in our garden and made our first batches of rhubarb jam and a cake! More rhubarb is growing, but we won’t have enough to make all the jam we need for the market. We were delighted to learn that  Camel’s Back Harvest in Pemberton will be able to supply Le Meadow’s Pantry this summer!

Rhubarb Macerating
Rhubarb Macerating

Rhubarb releasing it’s juice before we turn it into a luscious jam.

Upside down rhubarb cake
Upside down rhubarb cake

This is the cake my beloved grand-maman Irène used to make every spring with the first rhubarb from her garden. They also grew red and black current and gooseberries to make delicious jellies. The jars were kept sealed and served on cold days to brighten up the long winter back east.

Rhubarb upside down cake

~ I used a well-seasoned cast-iron pan skillet but a cake pan would work too.

For topping:

4 tablespoons  unsalted butter

3/4 cup packed brown sugar ~ I used sucanat sugar~

1 1/2 pounds rhubarb stalk, trimmed and cut into 1 inch pieces ~about 3 cups

For cake:

1 1/2 cups unbleached flour

1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon baking soda

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon

8 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature

2/3 cup brown sugar~ I used sucanat

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 teaspoon almond extract

2 large eggs

3/4 cup whole milk

Preheat oven at 350 F

Make the topping:

Heat butter in skillet gently until foam subsides. Reduce heat to low and sprinkle sugar and cook without stirring for 3 minutes. Remove skillet from heat and place rhubarb in one layer on sugar mixture. Set aside.

Make the cake:

1.In a large bowl mix all the dry ingredients.

2.Beat together butter and sugar in a large bowl with an electric mixer at high speed, about 1 minute.

3.Add vanilla and almond extract to the sugar and butter and add eggs one at a time, beating well after each addition.

4.Reduce speed and add flour mixture alternately in batches with milk, beginning and ending with flour mixture.

5.Mix until just combined.

Bake the cake:

1.Spoon cake batter over the rhubarb without disturbing the rhubarb.

2.Bake cake until golden and a wooden skewer inserted in center comes out clean, 40 to 45 minutes.

3.Cool in skillet on a rack for 15 minutes.

4.Run a thin knife around edge of skillet. Wearing oven mitts, invert a plate over skillet and, keeping plate and skillet firmly pressed together, invert cake onto plate.

5.Carefully lift skillet off cake.

6.Serve cake warm or at room temperature.

Spring Awakening

Willow
Willow

              The strong force of the wind brought spring at Le Meadow’s Pantry. It took down a big branch on our willow tree.

Strawberry
Strawberry

The strawberry plants are warming up under the morning sun.

Plum
Plum

The plum trees are slowly showing their buds.

Rhubarb
Rhubarb

We can’t wait to cook the rhubarb with the wild roses that grows around the farm.

Asparagus
Asparagus

Asparagus are piercing through the ground!

Boysenberry
Boysenberry

Juicy and sweet, they will be cherish.

Cherry
Cherry

Almost in bloom!

Black and red current, gooseberry
Black and red current, gooseberry

Sweet with an earthy taste, they will make the perfect jelly.

Apple
Apple

Our beautiful espalier apple tree has survived the bears .

Queen Anne Cherry
Queen Anne Cherry

With their yellow and light pink blush, these cherries make the perfect peach and cherry jam!

Raspberry
Raspberry

Who can resist a perfectly ripe raspberry ?

Daffodils
Daffodils

Daffodils are shining all over the Meadow’s Pantry.

Preserving the daunting aroma of Meyer lemon

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The Meyer lemon is famous for its juicy, lovely sweet orange-lemon flavourful pulp and incomparable perfume. Rounder than conventional lemon, it has a smooth, thin yellow rind that deepens to orange-yellow as it ripens and it is almost seedless.

The fruits expert David Karp tells us that the Meyer lemon (C.x meyeri) was introduced to the United States by another plant explorer, Frank Meyer who discovered the tree growing in pots near Peking in 1908. At that time, lemons were indigenous to India and exotic and scarce in China. Recently a researcher at the University of California at Riverside have determined that the Meyer lemon is a hybrid and that its female parent is almost certainly a sweet orange, and the male a lemon or citron.

Every part of the lemon can be use in cuisine. The fragrant skin contains valuable oils that add flavours to drinks, and every kind of dessert. A meyer lemon is different from a regular lemon. If you are using a Meyer lemon you will use it first for it’s perfume, sweetness and subtlety of it. Yet, when you taste it, you may want to add a touch of regular lemon to give it a little more depth.

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Meyer Lemon

The Meyer lemon’s complex, almost floral flavour and aroma combine happily with grapefruit, honey, lemon, lime, orange, vanilla, thyme, bay leaf and mint.

Meyer lemons are usually grown in California but are becoming more widely available. They are perishable and are not in the market for long during the winter months. The beauty of preserving Meyer lemons is that it gives you a way to enjoy them year-round.

Preserved lemons are common in Moroccan dishes but their complex, bright flavour and aroma enliven all kinds of soups, stews, salads and drinks.

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Preserved Meyer Lemons

 

To make preserved lemons you will need:

10 -12 Meyer Lemons

2/3 cup unrefined grey sea salt fine or coarse

Spices that you may want to experiment with:

cinnamon stick, cloves, saffron, fennel seeds and coriander seeds.

Prep:

1.Scrub the lemons with a vegetable brush and dry them off.

2.Quarter the lemons starting at the top to within 1/2-inch of the bottom, making a big X shape into the lemon but have the bottom still attached.

3.Sprinkle salt on the exposed flesh of each lemon and then reshape the fruit.

4.Place 1 tablespoon salt on the bottom of a sterilized one-pint mason jar. Place the salt-filled lemons in the jar and push them down, adding more salt. Press down the lemons to release their juices and to make room for the remaining lemons. (If the juice released from the squashed lemon does not cover them, add freshly squeezed lemon juice). If you are using spices, add them as you layer the lemons.

5.Leave some air space at the top of the jar before sealing. Cover and let stand over night. The next day, press the lemon down again to release more juice. The lemons should be completely submerged with juice. If they are not, add some freshly squeezed lemon juice until they are covered.

6. Let the lemons ripen for 30 days at room temperature, shaking the jar every other day to distribute the salt and juice. After 4 or 5 weeks they are ready and can be store in the refrigerator. After 6 months they taste even better.

4. To use, you may rinse the lemons as needed under running water to remove the excess salt. Cut the lemon in half and scrape the pulp. The pulp can be used in drinks. Chopped the remaining peel and use as a condiment for grilled meat, fish and vegetables, lamb tagine and chicken. Once you start using them, they soon become a necessity in a myriad of dishes !

The preserved lemons keep, refrigerated , for up to 1 year.

Do you have a favourite recipe for Meyer Lemon?

At Le Meadow’s Pantry we make an awesome marmalade with Meyer lemon and lemon verbena and we call it Sunshine in a Jar.. It will be available soon at the farmer’s market!